10 Things Only Kids Whose Parents Are Teachers Understand 

Everyone brings Backpacks, notebooks, folders, No. 2 pencils with them when they come to school. But I am different from all of my classmates because in my case, I bring two extra accessories with taking to school every day. These are my lovey parents because my dad and mom both are my teacher’s school. So this is really great for me to have such teachers. Being a teacher kids there are something that only I am aware of but other guys of class don’t know. Today I am going to share what are the Things Only Kids Whose Parents Are Teachers Understand.

My father (My teacher) taught math’s of grade eighth and ninth, while my mother encouraged composing and business classes. So from 6th grade on, I imparted those blessed corridors to my parents. Also, like most things throughout everyday life, the circumstance accompanied a considerable amount of upsides and drawbacks. In the event that your parent was likewise a teacher at your school, I’m sure you recognize what I mean. So on my behalf of teachers’ children all over the place — and I’m sure there’s a slot of us out there — here are the things that no one but we(Teachers’ kids) can genuinely comprehend.

  • On the First Day of School, All of Your Teachers Already Knew Who You Were

As usual, when someone goes to his schools on 1st day, No one knows him. Due to this, the student becomes depressed in school on the first day but for me and others who are children of teachers, this becomes totally different. Something like this “Oh, it’s so nice to finally meet you, Kelly. I’ve heard such a lot about you.” Awesome, now I’m getting to spend the whole year wondering what percentage embarrassing childhood stories you recognize about me.

  • You were held at a higher standard.

All your teachers knew you—the good and bad—before the primary bell rang. You were expected to behave, get good grades, be social (but not too social) and set an example for other kids. It was exhausting.

  • All projects had to be done entirely on your own

You knew that other kids basically got their parents to form their paper-mâché volcanoes for them. But your parents kept banging on about homework are supposed to check your ability, not theirs. Damnit.

But your parents kept banging on about homework are supposed to check your ability, not theirs. Damnit.

  • Having an endless source of money for recess and lunch purchases.
  • Your home is crammed with mismatched mugs Kids

If you’re getting to buy your teacher a mug, make it a pleasant, tasteful one. Not the awkwardly shaped ‘BEST TEACHER EVER’ choice, complete with a tiny bear wearing a graduation cap.

  • And If One of Your Friends Got Yelled at in Class

Somehow it ended up feeling love it was all of your faults. Like you should be held liable for your parent’s actions (You also most likely got bitched at immediately after class.)

  • Even Teachers You Didn’t Have Knew Your Name

When I said I wanted to be popular, this is often so not what I had in mind

  • Your home seemed to have an endless supply of red pens.

My mom was always grading papers. Often I got asked to grade papers, too. I learned to decipher first-grade penmanship like a pro. But if you needed a blue pen…you were outta luck.

  • You dreamed of being a teacher.

Whenever we played “school” I always asked to be the teacher. Every time someone asked what I wanted to be once I grew up, I said “teacher.” Adults would always say, “You’d make an excellent teacher someday.” So why am I not a teacher? Good question.

  • All projects had to be done entirely on your own

You knew that other kids basically got their parents to form their paper-mâché volcanoes for them. But your parents kept banging on about homework are meant to test your ability, not theirs. Damnit.