The National Rifle Association (NRA) Would Oppose a Repeal on the Second Amendment

I reviewed the three groups cited in the gun violence issue related to the second amendment to repeal the constitution. Based on their webpage, the National Rifle Association (NRA) would oppose a repeal on the second amendment. The primary reason for this is that their main source of subscribers to their website are gun aficionados, who love to shoot. On the front page of the website, they have a list of possible gun ranges around your area. When you click on the NRA-ILA, “Tireless defenders of your second amendment rights”, it launches into a page with articles on other issues attacking your rights (COVID-19 for example). The group that would support a repeal the second amendment is “United Against Gun Violence.” Brady page on their front page they have multiple pictures and infographics showing data for gun violence. Most if not all of this evidence supports the idea that allowing people access to guns creates more violence. In the final citation of the case “McDonald v. Chicago”, the supreme court ruled that the right to bear arms are “fundamental to the Nation’s scheme of ordered liberty”.

I have my thoughts on the gun repeal movement. I agree with the notion that being allowed access to weapons will make it more likely for violent acts to occur, but it doesn’t matter what type of weapon it is, if someone wants to hurt others, they will find any means to do so. Countries that have outright banned guns might have a lowered gun crime rate, but people still manage to create violence and terror with knife attacks. That being said, I think that having a background check on gun owners would be a good way to at least curb some of the gun violence, and prevent attacks before they start.

According to Pew Research, 60% of gun deaths are suicide, 37% are murder and 3% are other. This would suggest that if we could keep guns out of the hands of those that are less mentally fit, we could do a lot to reduce the number of gun deaths each year. The universal background check that Gifford’s Law proposes would eliminate the loophole of private gun sales between private parties and at gun shows. If this law was universal across America, it would disallow people to transport guns from other states to sell them illegally where firearms are not allowed.

Gifford’s law center also recommends banning assault weapons which are high powered weapons that shoot and kill humans quickly. It is somewhat understandable to have a small pistol for basic self-defense, having an assault rifle that can shoot multiple bullets at high volumes is just ridiculous. No one needs that much firepower, not unless they are in a war zone, and the fact that the government allows the sales of those types of guns without background checks is simply ridiculous. I understand that victims of abuse and rape tend to want these things as a personal defense mechanism, however; if it is for self-defense, a knife would work just as well as any gun if it is a close combat scenario.

I personally don’t see the reason for changing the gun laws according to COVID-19, I don’t understand how they correlate with each other. The disease is a problem right now, but I simply do not see a connection between that and gun violence or why it appears so many people are buying guns and ammunition. I’ve heard some stories of people getting violent over the toilet paper and hand sanitizer shortage, but I don’t think that people are paranoid or desperate enough to shoot others for it. There have been no reported cases, to my knowledge, of people shooting others with guns due to the pandemic.

I don’t think it’s practical or possible to repeal the second amendment. There are reasons that average citizens should own guns for sport hunting or if they are animal farmers and need to “take down an animal” if for instance a horse was injured. I do think banning assault weapons and universal background checks will go a long way to reducing gun violence. Take guns out of the hands of the unstable and remove the multi-shot weapons.

I do think that constitutional amendments may not be able to change government structures but I think the Constitution is broad enough so that the details of how people bear arms in the Second Amendment can be managed through the legislature and the courts. Even things like the freedom of speech don’t allow you to yell ‘fire’ in a movie theatre when there is none and cause panic. Mostly because yelling that sort of thing could bring harm to the public, as it could cause a panic, and allow people to trample over each other in the confusion.

Maybe part of the problems with guns in America is the glamorization of them in Hollywood movies. Oftentimes the main characters in gun movies are portrayed as cool action heroes, who can save the day no matter what and always get the girl. The movie is often filled to the brim is ‘awesome’ action scenes that glamorize the gunfights to make them seem cool. What they don’t address is how each of those bullets can take a life, take someone away from their family, that, even if they’re a good shot, one day they will miss and hit an innocent. Even in police work, there have been cases of police making a mistake and shooting the wrong person. Action movies make gun violence normalized, but it should never be normalized because then people will see others dying as a normal thing.

I believe that even if they don’t change laws according to social issues, the government should at least publicly address these issues and be clear on what their stance on the issue is. Changing a law according to a social issue depends on the severity of the issue itself. With gun violence, LGBTQ+ problems, and problems with racism, I do think these things need to be addressed in the US Government; with more minor social problems, however, I don’t think that the government is required to give a response.

Works Cited

  1. “Assault Weapons.” Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, lawcenter.giffords.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/hardware-ammunition/assault-weapons/.
  2. Gramlich, John. “What the Data Says about Gun Deaths in the U.S.” Pew Research Center, Pew Research Center, 16 Aug. 2019, www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/08/16/what-the-data-says-about-gun-deaths-in-the-u-s/.
  3. ‘McDonald v. Chicago.’ Oyez, www.oyez.org/cases/2009/08-1521.
  4. Nra-Ila. “ILA: Home.” NRA, www.nraila.org/.
  5. “United Against Gun Violence.” Brady, www.bradyunited.org/.
  6. “Universal Background Checks.” Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, lawcenter.giffords.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/background-checks/universal-background-checks/.