Psychiatric and Psychosocial Issue

The main purpose of the article is to highlight the effects of heroin consumption among the teenage population in some of the cities of the United States. The sources, as well as the various forms with which the drug manifests itself, are also part of the scourge that is prevalent in the US, given the economic and social implications, this has on the society. However, having discussed such, the article offers various solutions to those who may have drowned in the addiction of the drug as well as ways with which those who are under peer pressure can employ to avoid the effects of the substance. Additionally, the barriers to the successful administration have also been widely explored as well as the implications of using some of the clinical control techniques.

Summary of the Article

As alluded to above, the article explores the various ways through which the drug is abused within the United States. To me, the author is passing a cautionary message to psychiatric nurses that the use of heroin has been on the increase among the US teenage population where he gives the story of Jessica who was on the brink of death. The source of heroin use can be traced back to the early 1960s and the usage has been increasing over time among the populations. It is noted that the source of the drug is Mexico and Colombia with each country producing different forms of the same drug. That despite the effects of the drug, nearly 75% of the users are in their early 20s and the percentage is likely to increase in the near future.

Nevertheless, health practitioners, together with psychiatrists have discovered various forms of medication to help heal those who have been adversely affected (Phelps & Hassed, 2012). Through a working opioid replacement therapy (ORT), many heroin users have been assisted and helped with transformation. Nevertheless, the various barriers existing have affected the application of ORTs hence becoming a major stumbling block to the nursing fraternity. The article notes that, for one to receive early medication, there is the need for them to speak out and seek for assistance before the effects hit advanced levels. Personally, I think this will help save tremendous resources in form of financial and non-financial restoring the individual back to normalcy.

Nursing implications

That nurses and psychiatrists need to understand that heroin affects the brain cells of an individual hence proper prescription should focus on the need to restore the cells back to normal. There is the need for widespread information into the public domain through relevant outlets such as the media to create public awareness across all population ages. That the adolescent stage needs to be harnessed to help reduce the effects of peer pressure that are dwindling the hopes and aspirations of millions of teenagers across the United States.

However, the article holds that for proper medication to be realized, the affected individual need to be identified well in advance and guided through a complete diagnosis.Impact on patient care Heroin is a dangerous drug. Dangerous in the sense that it kills. Those who have been abusing it need to be properly taken care of hence the need to set aside adequate resources for such care. Without such, one is assured of a death penalty the reason why daily prescriptions are advisable. The need to acknowledge such individuals in the society is also paramount as failure to do so lowers their self-esteem making it difficult for full healing.

Summary of Data

The main reason why the drug is highly consumed is due to its affordability. Initially, the drug went down from $1.75/mg to $1.18/mg. this was due to the increase by 49% of opium production in Afghanistan, Mexico, and Colombia. Jessica is among the 75% of the teenage population who are in the risk of dying of heroin consumption. Such individuals have a 10%-30% higher mortality rates than those who do not abuse heroin, a rate which I think is higher than average.

References

Phelps, K., & Hassed, C. (2012). Psychiatry & Psychosocial Medicine (1st ed.). London: Elsevier Health Sciences APAC.`