Alice In Wonderland and Philosophy

In “Alice In Wonderland and Philosophy” the author argues that Alice shows many characteristics of a feminist. A feminist is “a person who supports feminism” according to google dictionary. I agree with this statement due to the fact that there are many examples in the book to support that statement. For an example, Alice had to eat and drink things to change her appearance to fit in but as the book continues she realizes that she doesn’t have to do that and then they started changing for her not the other way around. In this essay I will first explain how society’s views on women affect the decisions being made to become a feminist and how that changed Alice to become one. Then I will defend my view and the authors view by supporting the statement saying Alice is feminist using resources from the book.

Alice, unlike other fairy-tale idols, doesn’t have a fairy godmother, huntsman, or good fairy. Just her own wits and imagination to move through Wonderland successfully, keeping her head on straight. People know Alice through Disney, and this Disney idol Alice is a precursor to the strong Belle and Mulan and counter to Cinderella and the passive Aurora and Snow White, who require male aid to bring them to life and reality again.If you have ever seen the movie you will know that Alice was the complete opposite not needed a male figure to guide her through wonderland. Alice’s journey through Wonderland has long been seen as a whimsical tale and a great overall movie people tend to look past the deeper meaning behind the movie and the philosophical views that the movie imposes. “The curiosity and confidence that Alice has connects her with other unruly women we see in today’s society, such as Shakespeare’s Kate, Marilyn Monroe, Hillary Clinton and Eve. Alice’s direct, blunt approach to life is refreshing and something the young women can relate to. They understand the story of a young woman who has the world before her, ready to make a mark on life, who changes herself, primarily by eating and drinking, to fit in. She encounters all types, tests herself, tastes life around her, and once she learns the right combination to fit in and be comfortable with herself, she’s welcomed into a beautiful world where she possesses wisdom, power, and prestige.” Being a feminist doesn’t take a whole lot just a person knowing what they stand for and how they want their voices to be heard.

We today see a lot of people wanting to speak their mind but are fearful as to what might happen. This is a prime example as to why she is viewed as a feminist. She’s very straight forward and doesnt let the idea of motherhood define her no, instead she defines motherhood. Her sister presents one vision of women, those well educated with little to do. Reading a book without pictures or conversations is useless to Alice, and she seeks other means to occupy herself. Next she contemplates making a daisy chain but wonders whether the pleasure of making a daisy chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies. This shows that she is able to make her own decisions based on how she sees fit not based on what she is expected to do. When the white rabbit appears she realizes neither sitting and or reading nor making daisy chains satisfies her, Alice follows the White Rabbit down the hole and chooses an active function within the world, even if that world is Wonderland. Motherhood Is Not a Requirement Alice’s journey in Wonderland begins with a rejection of one female stereotype, the idle woman, embodied in her sister reading to keep the time passing. Continuing her journey in Wonderland, Alice learns more about the power of women when she literally opens the door for herself. Alice finds herself at the Duchess’s door and knocks.. This exchange between Alice and the Frog-Footman follows: “But what am I to do?” said Alice. “Anything you like,” said the Footman, and began whistling. “Oh, there’s no use in talking to him,” said Alice desperately: “he’s perfectly idiotic!” She opened the door and went in. Her inability to enter the house through current means, acting the proper, prim female, causes Alice to question her situation: “What am I to do?” The Frog-Footman’s response, “Anything you like,” opens up all possibilities for her.

This is when she learns that she is capable of a lot and she can depend on her self to do what it is that she wants. Here she learns that the norms of society that she may follow really mean very little. She has the power to do anything within herself, a theme that recurs throughout the story. Alice’s message for today in Wonderland and the world in general is that young women can do anything they like no matter how society views them or what is expected from women.