Homeschooling Way of Education

Envision sitting at home with the same individuals consistently, perhaps in a dangerous situation, not being able to socialize with others. Children may not be secure in their home throughout the day, their family could be unable to afford the cost of the right materials for homeschooling, and above all, they don’t get the appropriate social skills. Homeschooling can prevent kids from being who they need or decide to be. Every day brings something very similar. All of these problems lead to homeschooling being not as effective in all households.

Firstly, some guardians decide not to teach their children and keep them in a hazardous house or neighborhood, this leads to improper education they need for life. Numerous families don’t have the right home life to effectively teach their kids. A few families may have an unpleasant way of life, live in a temperamental neighborhood, or not have appropriate child care to make their kids smarter and more secure. Now and again, homeschooling isn’t as safe as individuals may think. A few circumstances are as frightful as children being held hostage and harmed. As the “Under Cover of Home-Schooling” article states, “ In a 2014 study of child torture, Barbara Knox, a pediatrician at the University of Wisconsin, found that 47% of school-age victims had been withdrawn from school for home-schooling and an additional 29% had never been enrolled” (Coleman and Brightbill).

This shows that many severe abuse cases involving school-age children also tend to involve home-schooling. Homeschooling isn’t effective in everybody’s lives. Some children do not get the customary education because their “guardian” is more focused on how to punish their child. Homeschooling can fail children completely, with horrific results. Some parents do not give their children what they need, children will not know what to do in the real world. Rachel Coleman and Kathryn Brightbill’s article states, “A family was running a small, home-based private school for the kids, while they were keeping their kids chained and malnourished while filing the proper paperwork each year” (Coleman and Brightbill). This demonstrates that not every state requires proper paperwork to be documented. The family could have easily filed paperwork without the government even knowing whether it was done by the children or not. Homeschooling parents do not have the right to refuse to educate their children or to use home-schooling as a cover for battery and neglect.

As “Child Welfare Information Gateway” tells us that “for over three academic years, 2013 to 2016, there were 380 students withdrawn from school to be home-schooled in the six districts. Of those children, 138 (36 percent) lived in families that were the subject of at least one prior accepted report to DCF for suspected abuse or neglect. 24% of the children lived in families that were the subject of multiple accepted reports” (Wekerle, Christine). Details from the article show that taking children out of public or private schooling may not always be the safest alternative. As many people begin to notice, homeschooling is not always as safe as parents make it sound. Percentages are skyrocketing. Children throughout the world are mentally and physically failing. Some of the student’s “teachers” may not be a good role model or teacher for that matter. Most families think that schooling from home is more beneficial, but that isn’t true. Many parents or guardians would rather have their kids learning safely than being unsafe, but in this case, many families take this to their advantage. Putting kids in a harmful situation is NEVER an option.

Secondly, some families that choose homeschool do not have the proper materials to supply their students with an education, it may be very costly. For instance, many families that choose to homeschool, financially can not afford it. This leads to the student’s not having proper education and them struggling with their future life. In comparison, readers know that public schooling is free, while homeschooling can be quite expensive. Most families do not realize how costly purchasing the newest curriculum and teaching tools can be. Found on the “5 Costs of Homeschooling” site, “estimates that the average parent spends about $300 to $600 per year, per child, on homeschooling curriculum, games, and books” (Levin).

Specifically, parents may choose to use a paid homeschooling program, such programs may have added benefits, but may increase the cost of the child’s education. Depending on the curriculum, it will most likely be the biggest expense when families start homeschooling, and prices run the scale. Take into consideration that the curriculum is very high-priced, but there are other costs to keep in mind, like project materials, stationery, books, computer software, and field trips. As a result, parents who choose to homeschool their children should be prepared to spend more money than parents who send their children to public or private schools.

Ultimately and above all, students will not have proper social skills for any situation. Social skills are the most important factor in a child’s life. Growing up without other children to be around, homeschoolers will lack a social filter and social life. Particularly, homeschooling deprives children of legitimate socialization every day. Many guardians pick when the students go out to play at a park or go to a library session with different children. This isn’t letting the children spread their wings and do what they choose to do. Having a parent attached to a child’s hip is not generally the best thing to grow up with. Most children are stuck at home with no company, other than their siblings and adults. Additionally, multiple homeschoolers have a hard time applying for, getting into, and adjusting to college.

As stated on the “US News Website,” Meagan McGovern, a mom that homeschools all three of her children, including her 18-year-old son who plans to attend college next year. She confesses ‘the college application process can be challenging for homeschooling parents to navigate, but not impossible’ (McGovern). This shows that the process can be very difficult. It can be tedious and time-consuming and very detailed, and if a child or parent misses a step, that child may not get into a college that year. Many homeschoolers could go to college clueless if they do not know how to associate with other people. Students will not receive very many social skills while getting homeschooled, so they may feel frightened by other people that they are not used to.

On the other hand, some families live in a safe, healthy environment for their children, but some families that choose to homeschool should not be homeschooling with the environment they live in. Many families think that the solution for making homeschooling safe is relatively easy. Many schools or families may force contact with mandatory reporters. An additional solution could be States requiring annual assessments by a certified teacher and annual doctor’s visits, creating at least two opportunities for a trained professional to recognize abuse. Although this process may seem easy, it is quite complex. When many people think of homeschooling they think of something where students learn and benefit compared to private or public schoolers. Home-school parents do not need to submit academic assessments or show evidence that they are educating their children.

There is no process to ensure that their children are involved in the community, nothing to ensure that they have contact with anyone at all. If readers think about it, not everyone lives in an identical safe neighborhood that has no crime rates whatsoever. As declared on the Los Angeles Times Website, “more than 40% of severe and fatal cases involve some form of imprisonment. The Turpin children were found chained to their beds” (Coleman and Brightbill). This shows that not every family can supply students with the proper home life they need. Kids getting hurt is very extreme but it is more common than people may think.

Diversely, some families may be able to afford homeschooling with no problems, but others may have financial problems and struggle with daily expenses that homeschooling may bring. Homeschooling can be quite costly on some occasions, but some families have no problems and can easily pay for homeschooling. One of the unique advantages of homeschooling is that families have complete control over how much it costs. Guardians can use different websites like Khan Academy, IXL, and even ABC Mouse. People can also purchase used books to save extra money for more important materials. There are many ways to cut the price down a bit. For example, families can take advantage of tax-free shopping days to purchase school supplies, use their local library liberally, including the online educational subscriptions they often offer, attending used book sales and homeschool curriculum fair, and keeping an eye out for free educational events and programs for children offered in that area.

Found on “Scholars Strategy Network”, it asserted, “homeschooling advocacy organizations claim that homeschooling costs as little as $400 per year” (Lubeinski and Brewer). Although 400 dollars may not sound like too much, it is not always going to be that low-priced. Many families may think, wow, this is a great price, but they need to understand that it only works if it is done precisely. This might sound like a great deal, but guardians may never get supplies for that cheap. Yes, guardians or children may find great books, but some books may not be up to date, and the students will not be educated well enough. Families will need to look hard to get the proper education and supplies for their children, and this may lead to spending a couple of extra bucks.

All of these extra expenses may add up to over $1,000, which at this point it would be more reasonable to go to private or public schooling. Homeschooling can add to monthly expenses in numerous and complex ways, in which, many of these have not been considered. It is important to overlook the ways that homeschooling may affect the wallet. This can help begin to assist parents with planning similarly. For instance, self-teaching can mean extra gas for field trips, excursions, and a slight increase in the basic food bill. While being at home throughout the day, this can frequently require more snacking, extra supply expenses to cover science tasks, artwork, and hands-on activities at home.

Nevertheless, parents may think that being with the family will create more memories or stronger relationships, but they are not forming bonds with other children their age. As homeschooled children eventually grow up they are going to feel lost. They will not know anyone or have the proper skills to start a lasting conversation. Found on “Homeschooling’s True Colors,” it pronounces, “Many people think that a child may be missing out on childhood memories that students have AT SCHOOL. Many children are making fun, happy memories all on their own. They are having their brand of fun. Their memories do not have to look like yours to be good ones” (Gathercole). This demonstrates that all kids have a different way of bonding with different people. Children are not always going to have their parents with them. They can not be successful in life if they do not have friends to guide them, a family member does not always have to be a child’s number one priority. Granite, some kids may rely on their guardians if they are homeschooled, but this can be resolved if they are sent to public or private schooling to be with a different group of people.

All together, homeschooling is not beneficial in every single household. Homeschooling may not be safe, which leads to improper education, kids might not have appropriate instruction and supplies due to the costly price, and lastly, children will not be able to socialize in the real world. Even though homeschooling could be safe, with knowledgeable educators, and inexpensive options, it is still not perfect in all circumstances.