Napoleon’s Use of Propaganda

What is propaganda? Propaganda is information especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view. Animal Farm is written by George O’rwell it reflexes occurrence events that led up to the Russian Revolution of 1917. Beast of England and Comrade Napoleon from Animal Farm includes many examples of propaganda. George Orwell Animal Farm includes many examples of propaganda because it includes “Beast of England”, “Comrade Napoleon”, and they are different types of propaganda.

Beast of England includes propaganda. Pathos is found in Beast of England because it appears to the audience emotions. In the text it states, “ Hearken to my joyful tidings of the Golden future time ( Orwell 3-4).” All the animals are listening to the news about the future. The animals must listen to the news to overthrown the humans so that humans can be free. The poem Beasts of England includes Logos because it appeals to the audience’s reasoning. In the text it states,“ For that day we all must labour, All must toil for freedom’s sake (O’rwell 21-24).” The animals must labour in order to see freedom. After the animals get rid of the humans the land will be nice and dazzling. The animals must labour in order to get food. In George O’rwell Animal Farm and Beats of England include propaganda.

Comrade Napoleon includes propaganda. In Comrade Napoleon pathos is a method of convincing people with an argument drawn out through an emotional response. In the text it states, “ Oh, how my soul is on Fire when I gaze at thy (O’rwell 3-4).” The speaker feels some type of way in his soul when he looks at them. The pathos found in the article makes the reader have emotions behind his words. The poem Comrade Napoleon includes ethos because it appeals to the audience’s sense of mural. In the text it states, “Friend of fatherless! Fountain of happiness! (O’rwell 1-2).” The animals that don’t have a father looks up to him. Happiness is pouring out of the animals because of what he does for the animals. In Comrade Napoleon George O’rwell includes propaganda.

Beasts of England and Comrade Napoleon uses different types of propaganda. Beast of England uses propaganda to explain that the animals must overthrow their leader to see freedom. In the text it states, “Tyrant Man shall be O’verthrown, And the faithful fields of England (O’rwell 6-7).”The animals must rebel against their human master in order to be free and equal. The song portrays humans as tyrannical and portrays life under humans rule as miserable and oppressive. Its purpose is to inspire loyalty to the farm and also to the new leadership. Comrade Napoleon uses propaganda to explain that Napoleon is the best leader. In the text it states, “All the thu creatures love, fully belly twice a day, clean straw to roll upon (O’rwell 9-10).” Some people believe that Napoleon is a great leader because he takes care of the animals.

This is wrong because some people might think that Napoleon is a horrible leader because he overworks the animals. Napoleon is convincing the animals that how great of a leader he is because what he does for the animals. Napoleon watches out for the animals. He also contributes for them by giving them a home, a full belly twice a day, clean straw to lay on at night, and they are cherished by him. Napoleon provides for the animals and cares for them.

Beast of England and Comrade Napoleon include different types of propaganda. Animal Farm is filled with songs, poems, and slogans, including Major’s stirring “Beasts of England.”All of these songs serve as propaganda, one of the major conduits of social control. By making the working-class animals speak the same words at the same time, The songs also erode the animals’ sense of individuality and keep them focused on the tasks by which they will purportedly achieve freedom. Everyone should be treated equal and fair no matter how different they are.