Comparison of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci

Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci are known to be; without doubt the father of western art, greatest artist of thier lifetimes and most prominently greatest artist of all time. Michelangelo an Italian sculptor painter,architect and poet of high renaissance who was given birth in the ancient city of Florence. Born to Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni ( father) and Francesca di Neri ( mother) in the year 1475, while Leonardo da Vinci, an Italian polymath of the Renaissance who majored in inventions, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, paleontology, and cartography, born to a notary, Piero da Vinci, and Caterina, a peasant woman in Vinci , in the region of Florence, Italy in the year 1452. Both men where reknown in art and made unfathomable conquest in most aspect of sciences and art, but differ in the sense that Michelangelo is more of a sculptor because of his love for marble while Leonardo da Vinci is more of an inventor and painter.

Firstly, the major similarities between Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci is the their passion for art and a personality and talent that is held in high demands and esteem among men, women and children alike leaving all in awe and astonishment. This because they both showed unfathomable talents at early ages of their lifes and their works have graced history and scattered all over memorable places in history and in modern days being sold for fortunes. The most rare and importance of their many talents is their ability to capture happening and faces of past, present and future happenings in their art perfectly, the later mostly common in the arts of Leonardo da Vinci.

Another similarity that exist between Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci is the coincidental upbringing in the streets of Florence in Italy and more the uncertainty in credibilities of the histories of their mothers, with their abrupt uninterest in schooling in grammar but art at a very tender age. Lastly their similarities traces to hidden and intelligent meaning in their art over the years.

The differences between the work of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci is the concentration of Michelangelo to marble with Gorgio Vasari a great artist himself quoting him ‘If there is some good in me, it is because I was born in the subtle atmosphere of your country of Arezzo. Along with the milk of my nurse I received the knack of handling chisel and hammer, with which I make my figures.’ Having less interest in painting while Leonardo da Vinci concentrated his life works on paintings and great inventions of machine important to present and future warfare.

Lastly, the difference between these great legendary artist is their personal lifes. Michelangelo was known as an abstinent and temperate nature rough and uncouth with incredibly dirty domestic habits and described by others as solitary and melancholic in mannerism. While Leonardo da Vinci on the other hand is said to have many friends renowned in their different fields and significance in history although said to have no close relationships to women except on rare occasions and lastly a man of refined etiquette and tastes.

In conclusion, after comparing both men, there are similarities and differences that exist between tache two artists. Both are renowned for their achievements in art. While Leonardo da Vinci holding the personality of an extrovert among male friends and Michelangelo being an abject introvert.

References

  1.  A portrait of Leonardo , Royal Collection Trust, retrieved 26 May 2019
  2.  a b David Alan Brown, Leonardo (da Vinci), Leonardo Da Vinci: Origins of a Genius , Yale University Press, 1998, p. 7, ISBN 0-300-07246-5
  3.  Ian Chilvers (2003). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists . Oxford University Press. p. 354. ISBN 9780199532940.
  4.  Wells, John (3 April 2008). Longman Pronunciation Dictionary (3rd ed.). Pearson Longman.
  5. ISBN 978-1-4058-8118-0.
  6.  John Lichfield, ‘The Moving of the Mona Lisa’ , The Independent, 2 April 2005 (accessed 9 March 2012)
  7.  a b c Gardner, Helen (1970). Art through the Ages . pp. 450–56
  8. Wells, John (3 April 2008). Longman Pronunciation Dictionary (3rd ed.). Pearson Longman. ISBN 978-1-4058-8118-0. a b c d Michelangelo at the
  9. Encyclopædia Britannica
  10.  Hughes, A., & Elam, C. (2003). ‘Michelangelo’. Oxford Art Online . Retrieved 14 April 2018, from http://www.oxfordartonline.com
  11.  Smithers, Tamara. 2016. Michelangelo in the New Millennium: Conversations about Artistic Practice, Patronage and Christianity . Boston: Brill. p. vii. ISBN 978-90-04-31362-0.
  12.  Emison, Patricia. A (2004). Creating the ‘Divine Artist’: from Dante to Michelangelo . Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-13709-7.
  13. Art and Illusion, E.H. Gombrich